Tag Archives: Long Winter

WL14 reviews: Matrox @ Adelaide Hall – Feb 14, 2014

By Tom Beedham

Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham

Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 – Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham

The conceit Matrox offers at once in lieu of a “proper” band biography and in favour of a successful PR mythos is entertaining to digest: it is (or perhaps was) composed of robots sent from another planet (Planet Matrox) to colonize the people of Earth. Whether or not they intend to stay the course on that mission is less apparent; they seem to like the local colour, taking to Toronto’s local independent music scene to give scheduled concert performances.

Of course, the reality of the situation is that this is a synth-oriented trio composed of entirely human members, counting Alt Altman (Digits) among them. And when the group played Adelaide Hall last night for WL14, the suspension of disbelief Matrox requests was less simply maintained.

Although Matrox wandered onto the stage fully clad in its homemade robot gear and the mystique that comes with it, the opening of its performance was marred by a technical difficulty that ultimately forced the band to remove its helmets out of desperation to fix the glitch, fiddling with things like patch cords in a way that was all too human.

While the setback was temporary—resulting in a five-minute set delay at most—and the performance that followed was as stimulating as some of the showcases the group has already gigged at (All Toronto’s Parties, Long Winter, etc.), it also forced the audience to absorb another, entirely different, truth: this is a Toronto band mimicking a colonization outfit that is seeking to adopt the local culture as its own, absorbing attention at concerts first and foremost for its token “alien” idiosyncrasies. Everything from Matrox’s instruments—an arsenal of Korg and Behringer synths, a saxophone, and sound samples of revving motorcar engines—to its tendency to position itself onstage in a line à la Kraftwerk, is a farcical “appropriation.”

So, yes: Matrox’s set showed people that this group is more than just robot rock.

More photos:
Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham
Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham Matrox @ Adelaide Hall for WL14 - Feb. 14, 2014. Photo: Tom Beedham
Originally published by Aesthetic Magazine.

Concert Review: Long Winter Yr. 2 – Vol. 3: Jan. 10, 2014 @ The Great Hall

Even working double time, Long Winter flexes muscle
Tom Beedham

Long Winter returned to its home base at The Great Hall on Jan. 10 for the first regularly programmed Long Winter of 2014, offering a platform for new bands like Weaves (pictured above) to play alongside established Toronto musical acts like The Hidden Cameras, Rae Spoon, and more. Photo: Tom Beedham.

Long Winter returned to its home base at The Great Hall on Jan. 10 for the first regularly programmed Long Winter of 2014, offering a platform for new bands like Weaves (pictured above) to play alongside established Toronto musical acts like The Hidden Cameras, Rae Spoon, and more (more pictures below). Photo: Tom Beedham.

If people going to 2014’s first proper Long Winter event were expecting to catch its organizers with their pants down, they’ll have realized their mistake by now.

The folks at the traditionally monthly event have been putting in double time over the past two months to supplement its usual fare with some bonus programming – just a week prior, the event invaded the AGO and took over all programming responsibilities for the gallery’s own monthly culture celebration, First Thursdays, and a special just-for-kids version of the traditionally late night affair was held at LW home base The Great Hall less than a week before that.

Instead, Year Two – Volume Three saw LW once again increase the scale of its production, threading its tentacles even further throughout the Queen Street West and Dovercourt Road building’s hallows to include a new, fifth room that event-goers could cram into and watch bands in. Before last Friday’s event, bands could be seen in the main hall and the conversation room on the same floor, basement party cave BLK BOX, and (as of this season’s LW inauguration) the street-level Samuel J. Moore Restaurant.

Scale aside, the music lineup alone brought the night’s proceedings some of the most diverse programming the series has featured thus far. Save for a last minute cancellation that made for a temporary lull between early performances, the night featured steady, often competing performances from 16 musical acts.

Highlights:
The Hidden Cameras previewed material from their new album, Age (Jan. 21 via Evil Evil)
-Toronto rapper D-Sisive got the main hall bouncing to tracks from his new Raging Bull EP as well as older ones between comically salted asides. He threw out tributes to Corey Feldman and Michael Jackson, too.
-Elusive hardcore act Career Suicide stoked a set-long mosh pit in the BLK BOX with its current lineup and a special guest performance from Dallas Good (The Sadies).
Weaves – accountable for the rackety half of the night’s seven-inch giveaway – delivered its sometimes dizzying, always crazy noise rock to a packed Conversation Room that ate up frontwoman Jasmyn Burke’s theatrical delivery and all the abused instruments the band left in its wake, right up to and including drummer Spencer Cole’s set-closing kit-toss.
BA Johnston brought his self-deprecating comedy rock to the Samuel J. Moore Restaurant stage (and bar and floor and almost the street you can walk into the restaurant off of).
Bespoken invaded Studio 3 to deliver long-form chamber music to a cross-legged, floor-seated crowd (twice).
Ronley Teper wooed the earliest crowds up to the front of the main hall with her smokey-into-gargled à la Tom Waits vocals and a band – The Lipliners – that crammed the span of the stage.

Photos from Long Winter – Year 2, Volume 3:
The Hidden Cameras live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Bespoken live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. - Photo by Tom Beedham D-Sisive live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Rae Spoon live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Rae Spoon live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Ronley Tepper and the Lipliners live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves  live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at The Great Hall for Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three: Jan. 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham Weaves live at Long Winter Year Two - Volume Three @The Great Hall in Toronto, ON: January 10, 2014. Photo by Tom Beedham

Q&A: Andreas Buchwaldt talks construction, art, music, and community

Visual artist Andreas Buchwaldt models a yet unnamed wood-and-cardboard mobile accordion outside of his studio in Toronto's Junction Triangle. He will display the new piece to the public at the Great Hall on Dec. 13 for the second of this season's Long Winter events. Photo: Tom Beedham

Visual artist Andreas Buchwaldt models a yet unnamed wood-and-cardboard mobile accordion outside of his studio in Toronto’s Junction Triangle. He will display the new piece to the public at the Great Hall on Dec. 13 for the second of this season’s Long Winter events. Photo: Tom Beedham

[Monthly community arts event Long Winter recently signed me on to provide their website with blog content, so for the past week or so I’ve been keeping busy getting in touch with artists set to feature on their December 13 program. (Here’s my review of last month’s instalment and the shifted brand focus the series has adopted for this season.) Below is a chunk of the first of my Long Winter blog contributions: an interview I conducted with Andreas Buchwaldt, an artist who’s work usually focuses on architectural structure but is adapting his style to respond to the music that has been a constant at the monthly events with a wood-and-cardboard mobile accordion requiring the cooperation of three people to pump and play it.. You can read the full Q&A here.]

Tom Beedham: For the most part architecture weighs pretty heavy in your work – you’ve got blueprints, housing frames, lots of pieces that look like skeletons of structures that we’re used to seeing. How do you arrive at your subjects?
Andreas Buchwaldt: A lot of it’s architecturally based. So starting with blueprints or floor plans and it’s also exploring materials like Expandex and weird stretchy materials. I think I’m just trying to reimagine different ways of building structures you’d see in the everyday. I’m trying to imagine what a building would look like if it were made out of something completely different and how that material could change the way it functions – like how it would resist entropy. When a building crumbles because it gets old and worn out, if it was made out of rubber, what would happen? I’m just kind of posing those questions.

A lot of the most recent stuff is just from coming to Toronto. Condo towers just kind of crept into my art and the downtown core. It’s just kind of a general view of the skyline, just to try and take in all of the city at once. And then something we don’t have in Saskatoon – well we do have it but it’s predominate here, especially in the art scene – are all of these two-floor business-on-the-bottom/someone-lives-upstairs sort of things. That way of living – that two-storey, split purpose architecture – was just something that was kind of new to me.

TB: How about the blueprint pieces? Are you focusing on specific buildings?
AB: I found them online. I didn’t really feel like 3-D modeling my own things. But I like generalized architecture. Something that’s not too specific, but suggests a whole neighbourhood could be represented. Specifics get into the history of a certain building; I’m interested in the history of the city.

TB: What I take away from your pieces are these commentaries on space and perception that are delivered as kind of cheeky, mechanical distortions of architecture and how our structured realities are put together. Is there an intended humour to your work?
AB: Absolutely. I haven’t thoroughly studied the way Toronto’s been designed and constructed, but from what I can see just walking down the street, I think it’s incredibly idiotic the way things are torn down and then we build something up. It doesn’t solve the problem. Every time I see a new project being built in Toronto I’m never happy. It’s always a disaster. Like right behind you. Right behind my studio is this beautiful park that people would walk their dogs in, and now the space is being filled by… not condos, but these townhouse things. And now there’s nowhere in this area that’s worth hanging out at. I have to go to Trinity Bellwoods to go drink a beer with my friends in the park. There’s nowhere here to do that. This city is not well planned.

TB: How do you approach a topic like gentrification?
AB: That’s totally an interesting topic. I’m having to understand that as an artist, you’re like a foot soldier for gentrification whether you like it or not. You can say you’re against it, but you’re helping to gentrify an area. I think the problem is just taking up space with new gentrification. Like repurposing the street for Starbucks: whatever. But I think when you take new land – like the precious land that we have in Toronto – and then do something to propagate more of that shit just drives me crazy. [Read the rest over at torontolongwinter.com]

Another Long Winter

Inauguration of Long Winter’s second year hints at a less Fucked Up forecast
Words and photos by Tom Beedham

Doomsquad performing in the Samuel J. Moore restaurant on the main floor of The Great Hall on Nov. 8. November 8 marked the first time Long Winter used the restaurant as a venue for its programming. Photo: Tom Beedham

Doomsquad performing in the Samuel J. Moore restaurant on the main floor of The Great Hall on Nov. 8. November 8 marked the first time Long Winter used the restaurant as a venue for its programming. Photo: Tom Beedham

When Long Winter returned to The Great Hall on Nov. 8, it came too with the suggestion that audiences would receive a different version of the monthly melting pot-facilitating evenings than they might have come to expect from it last year.

To wit, the one reliable feature Long Winter regulars have become familiar with is the dependable lack of predictability tied to each night of the season spanning (and extending) arts and culture community event, but the first night of this season came with a significant rebranding.

The cover of Long Winter's program for Nov. 8. Noticeably absent is mention of Fucked Up, the band slated as the presenters of last year's Long Winter events. Photo: Tom Beedham

The cover of Long Winter’s program for Nov. 8. Noticeably absent is mention of Fucked Up, the band slated as the presenters of last year’s Long Winter events. Photo: Tom Beedham

Ushered into fruition just one year ago by Mike Haliechuk and Josh Zucker of ever-enterprising Toronto punk outfit Fucked Up, the monthly night of music, art, food, film, poetry, photography, dance, speakers, and (eventually) video games began as something that would allow Haliechuk and Zucker to program a local event. Throwing each of the nights to impressively broadened masses as all-ages, pay-what-you-can affairs, Long Winter established itself as a beacon for fairly accessible multi-media entertainment programming (unfortunately the Great Hall is only accessible by stairs; there is no elevator service), and as the events snowballed in scope as well as popularity, its varied offerings came to tessellate more and more of the rooms and hallways that make up the building accordingly.

The events relied on the somewhat small community of connections their band had both established and immersed itself in, and Fucked Up headlined most of the five shows, appropriately cited on Long Winter programs, posters, and online event pages as the force that “presented” each of the series’ instalments.

But as it returned this year with the support of the City of Toronto through the Toronto Arts Council, although Haliechuk and Zucker continue to run the show, Fucked Up’s name was nowhere to be found.

Speculation could go on forever as to why the band’s pedigree has been removed from the ephemera surrounding the series, but in terms of the void they left to be filled by another headliner – this time a slot arguably shared by psychedelic Guelph rock veterans King Cobb Steelie in the main hall and siblinged Toronto/Montréal darkwave trio Doomsquad in the newly Long Winter-dominated Samuel J. Moore restaurant on The Great Hall’s ground level – it’s worth noting that the series’ website includes a statement from Haliechuk boasting a commitment to diverse programming and calling for outside submissions.

“Everyone is welcome, and everyone who attended last year should feel as much a part of this event as we do. We aim to be a reflection of all the great things that people do in Toronto,” Haliechuk says – emphasis on the “all,” no doubt. It would be no great surprise if Fucked Up’s reduced identity were implemented in favour of that virtue.

The first of a series of split seven-inch records Scion Sessions is giving Long Winter audiences for free upon entry to the monthly event this season. Photo: Tom Beedham

The first of a series of split seven-inch records Scion Sessions is giving Long Winter audiences for free upon entry to the monthly event this season. Photo: Tom Beedham

The first 350 patrons entering November 8’s Long Winter would have immediately noticed one other big change as they passed through the doors, each of them granted a free split seven-inch featuring Doomsquad and Lido Pimienta, whom also performed that night. Contributed by the Hand Drawn Dracula-courting Scion Sessions, the record was the first of a series of Long Winter artist-featuring splits slated to be offered to guests for each of this year’s instalments.

From there on, though, it was mostly business as usual for one of Toronto’s most immersive entertainment programming series: there was music, there was art, there was food, there was theatre, there was comedy, there were video games, and there was music. Did I say there was music?

If guests ventured further upstairs to the hall’s balcony level and coat check, they would have approached and become a part of Steve Reaume’s art/light installation projecting some truly debilitating algorithmic patterns into a corner, and once they’d recovered from the dizzying effects of that, there was William Andrew Finlay Stewart’s “Fall” – a looping video project – waiting for them on the ground.

If you skipped dinner to get there early or just wanted some late night munchies, the main hall hosted all-vegan food offerings from Windowshade Delicatessen, who’s reuben sandwich variant will certainly earn their west College street location a personal visit from myself and everyone else I successfully peddle it on.

At any given point throughout the night you could also fill your time by drawing on (and having your picture taken with) one of 1078 disposed coffee cups with “Disposable,” a consumption-considering interactive installation from Anrea Wrobel and Brian Cauley.

Wake Island's Philippe M at Long Winter in The Great Hall's main hall on Nov. 8. PhotoL Tom Beedham

Wake Island’s Philippe M at Long Winter in The Great Hall’s main hall on Nov. 8. PhotoL Tom Beedham

Things really got rolling with Wake Island, though. Opening up the multi-stationed concert portion of the night in the main hall, the Montreal rock foursome hammered things home with some expert delivery, cementing its set as something other performers should have worried about following with guitarist Nadim M’s final tooth-picked solo.

Nevertheless, performer Ben Kamino took the stage once they’d finished, instructing the main hall to slow-dance eyes shut in a herd, urging participants to touch each other – not just with their hands but with all parts of their bodies – and by extension, “everyone in the universe.” You can imagine how that went. It was awkward. Kamino repeated this experiment twice more following bands in the main hall.

 Esther Grey at Long Winter in The Great Hall's Conversation Room on Nov. 8. Photo: Tom Beedham

Esther Grey at Long Winter in The Great Hall’s Conversation Room on Nov. 8. Photo: Tom Beedham

Esther Grey. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 1 Esther Grey. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 2 Esther Grey. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 3 Esther Grey. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 4 Esther Grey. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 5 Esther Grey. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 6 Esther Grey. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 7 Esther Grey. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 8
Next was Guelph garage rock act Esther Grey, warming up the Conversation Room. Bringing sometimes-member and saxophonist Dan Paille in tow, guitarist Steph Yates and bassist Nathan Campagnero’s plodding progressions were juxtaposed with some extra texture that I didn’t get to hear when I last reviewed them for their Kazoo! Fest show back in April. Paille’s sax is presented pretty sparingly in comparison to the core group’s output, so it works with the group’s minimalist explorations of instrumental spacing.

From Ben Kamino and Matt Kelly's

From Ben Kamino and Matt Kelly’s “Conflict. Resolution. Conflict,” an absurdist Beckettian skit performed in front of the crowd dissipating after Esther Grey’s set in the Conversation Room at The Great Hall for Long Winter. Photo: Tom Beedham

Fixed with elongated cardboard masks, Ben Kamino and Matt Kelly ambushed the crowd remaining in the room at the end of Esther Grey’s set with a guerilla theatre performance called “Conflict. Resolution. Conflict.” Their characters mostly just argued over an onion, but eventually they made up with a sweet(?) embrace that saw them sharing bites out of the very real, very potent vegetable and then scuttled out of the room.

Recovering from Kamino and Kelly’s adventure in Beckettian theatre and wandering back into the main hall, Rheostatics founder Dave Bidini’s new group Bidiniband guided audience through a literary-minded tour of rock history, only playing four stream-of-conscience-y “long ones” to negotiate the restraints of their set time.

If you rushed from Bidini’s set to the conversation hall, you would have caught a very confrontational Abyss, whose frontman spent the majority of the group’s grindcore assaults sharing the mic with one listener’s face, whether he liked it or not.

Lido Pimienta performing in The Great Hall's main hall on Nov. 8 for Long Winter. Photo: Tom Beedham

Lido Pimienta performing in The Great Hall’s main hall on Nov. 8 for Long Winter. Photo: Tom Beedham

Next up in the main hall was Lido Pimienta, who should really get props for exacting some very hands-on parenting all while singing and dancing onstage.

“Single mothers in this city are gangster, y’all,” Pimienta said. She proved she wasn’t wrong with her highly danceable genre-benders.

Vish Khanna (right) interviews 2013 Polaris Music Prize nominee Zaki Ibrahim as Exclaim! Editor-in-Chief James Keast (left) sits in for additional perspective during 'Late Night with Vish Khanna,' a new talk show-style addition to Long Winter's  monthly programming. Photo: Tom Beedham

Vish Khanna (right) interviews 2013 Polaris Music Prize nominee Zaki Ibrahim as Exclaim! Editor-in-Chief James Keast (left) sits in for additional perspective during ‘Late Night with Vish Khanna,’ a new talk show addition to Long Winter’s monthly programming. Photo: Tom Beedham

Meanwhile in the basement, the last really big new thing for Long Winter was in full sway with former Long Winter MC Vish Khanna hosting his own late night talk show Long Night with Vish Khanna in the BLK BOX theatre. Complete with the house band stylings of The Bicycles and Light Fires’ Regina Thegentlelady wandering onstage to the show featured talk show style interviews with guests including musicians Lou Barlow (Dinosaur Jr., Sebadoh) and 2013 Polaris Music Prize-nominated Zaki Abraham, as well as author and The Grid Senior Editor Edward Keenan, and Exclaim! Editor-in-Chief James Keast. While I missed Barlow entirely and only just made it downstairs in time for the tail end of Keenan’s portion of the show discussing his new Toronto political history Some Great Idea and recent developments involving Mayor Rob Ford, I did get to sit through Zaki Ibrahim, who also offered insight on the mayor, but more interestingly, her take on Godspeed You! Black Emperor’s treatment of its Polaris prize win. (“I felt like I had egg on my face,” Ibrahim said, after commenting that GYBE’s treatment of the prize and the gala was “cool.” Ibrahim also related GYBE to the Grateful Dead, provoking some (not very successfully) suppressed laughter from Keast.)

Doomsquad performing in the Samuel J. Moore restaurant as part of Long Winter on Nov. 8. Photo: Tom Beedham

Doomsquad performing in the Samuel J. Moore restaurant as part of Long Winter on Nov. 8. Photo: Tom Beedham

Doomsquad. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 1 Doomsquad. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 2 Doomsquad. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 3 Doomsquad. Long Winter. Tom Beedham. 4

Last for me were Doomsquad – giving the Samuel J. Moore restaurant its first Long Winter performance – playing their new age-evocative electronic music in some cavernous darkness (save for a salt lamp affixed to guitarist Trevor Blumas’ sampling table). The Blumas siblings challenged the physical resilience of the restaurant’s wall-to-wall window with crippling bass, offering only the soft textures of a pan flutes as a possible remedy.

From everything I was able to take in before calling it a night, The Great Hall seems properly primed for another season of Long Winter, even with the SJM restaurant added into the chaos (despite the potential for sonic disaster in the new venue, only some quickly resolved mixing issues that initially placed Trevor Blumas’ sampler way too low in the mix presented themselves over the course of the set). And from what I could make of the faces I saw on Friday, I think audiences are ready, too.

Hillside reviews: Fucked Up at Guelph Lake Island Stage – July 28, 2013

Fucked Up play unreleased material, announce return of Long Winter at Hillside

Fucked Up played unreleased material and announced the return of its Long Winter series at Hillside Festival in Guelph, Ont. Photo: Tom Beedham

Fucked Up played unreleased material and announced the return of its Long Winter series at Hillside Festival in Guelph, Ont. Photo: Tom Beedham

Fucked Up might have passed up a perfect opportunity to perform a rare (if not a three-years-in-the-making premiere) performance of “Solomon’s Song” with Colin Stetson at Hillside, but we’ll have to forgive them.

Having played a solo set on the Island Stage just hours before Fucked Up’s, the experimental saxophonist could have easily subbed in for Year of the Ox collaborator and Bitters member Aerin Fogel on the band’s 2010 Zodiac series b-side, but such is the stuff of the Guelph, Ont. festival’s highly regarded collaborative workshops – and not it’s regular concert presentations – anyway.

Instead, among some fistfuls of classics, Fucked Up used it’s half hour and change to test some (marginally shorter) new material it spent April and May holed up recording at Steve Albini’s Electrical Audio recording studios in Chicago. There was the “It’s the privilege of mass delusion” chorused track that has been performed without a name since the band debuted it at the February edition of its Long Winter series at The Great Hall in Toronto, and also “Daddy” (finally named after premiered untitled at Exclaim!’s North by Northeast showcase at the Horseshoe Tavern June18 – watch video of the song’s NXNE premiere below), which frontman Damian Abraham dedicated to the band’s children.

The band with the f-word name further proved itself to be a family affair when it closed with “The Other Shoe” and Abraham’s older son, Holden, was invited onstage to contribute group vocals to the song’s chorus (even if nerves got the best of him in the end).

While the new songs have been given stage time before, it’s no surprise Fucked Up would try to familiarize their fans with them while still providing sets that churn out previous full length classics like “Black Albino Bones” (which Abraham dedicated to anyone in the crowd afflicted with the “horrible addiction” of vinyl collecting), “Son the Father,” and “Turn The Season,” as well as 2012 single “I Hate Summer” to keep the crowd participation up. Still, with the studio time behind them, it’s easy to surmise that it’s only a matter of time before Fucked Up’s new LP drops and it’s given precedence over offerings from David Comes To Life and The Chemistry of Common Life; 2006’s Hidden World was virtually unrepresented at Hillside.

Still, the band was all nostalgia in between songs: Abraham asked fans if anyone was present for the band’s performance at Guelph’s long-since defunct punk commune, The Punkalow, and the singer also related a story about a Holy Fuck fan mistakenly attending one of Fucked Up’s shows and subsequently purchasing an album.

At the end of the set, Abraham made sure fans received random articles of clothing that arrived onstage by way of the pit, and Hillside host Vish Khanna announced the band’s Long Winter series would return to Toronto in November.

Related:
Watch: Fucked Up play “Daddy” at NXNE
Hillside reviews: Colin Stetson at Guelph Lake Island Stage – July 28, 2013
Hillside reviews: Supersonic (Lee Ranaldo and The Dust, Colin Stetson, Richard Reed Parry, Sarah Neufeld +guests) at Guelph Lake Island Stage – July 28, 2013